East meets west in dramatic theatrical celebration

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Vedanta ten- minute play festival focussed on Swami Vivekananda’s life will be held at the King Street Theatre from June 6 – June 8. This festival has its basic focus on exploring the life and teachings of Swami Vivekananda and his impact on Modern society.

The festival will take you to a journey of self-discovery through 22 plays set in the suburbs of contemporary Australia and the 18th Century India.

Swami Vivekananda the 19th century Indian reformer, leader, and mystic introduced yoga, meditation and interfaith understanding to the West. He inspired major historical and cultural figures as diverse as Mahatma Gandhi, the Dalai Lama and The Beatles’ George Harrison with his teachings.

Guide to millions and – through his order’s service to hospitals, schools and relief works – a benefactor to millions more, the Swami emerged as the worlds’ first ―pop star‖ in late 19th century America after his speeches at the first World Parliament of Religions in Chicago.

He’s still a major influence in India today.

“What we think we become.” – Swami Vivekananda

The festival will be curated by the former festival director of Short+Sweet Sydney and one of the world’s leading experts in ten-minute plays, Alex Broun, assisted by Robert Grant and Eleni Panayi.

Alex wrote and co-directed Oneness : Voice without form – the Extraordinary life of Swami Vivekananda, for its highly successful performances at the Sydney Opera House and Brisbane in 2013.

The creative energy of over 70 actors, writers and directors is focussed on the Festival including Vee Malnar and Tom Richards, writer and director respectively of the winning entry for this years’ Short+Sweet festival.

Festival Coordinator Robert Grant said, “ The plays present tales of the inspired and the troubled, the pious and the mysterious, the mystical and the humorous, the young and the old, from the Australian suburbs to the temples and train stations of India.”

Alex Broun said, “Vivekananda’s influence is huge to the world’s 2.4 billion of Hindus (the fastest growing faith in Australia according to the latest census with 275,000 identifying currently here) and a subtle influence behind the burgeoning worldwide interest in Yoga, meditation and the interfaith movement. How appropriate then that the participants in the festival are a wonderful multi-faith mix of Hindu, Muslim, Jewish and Christian writers, directors and actors.”

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